Big Data Security. Who's looking out for your big data?

David Tishgart

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Top Stories by David Tishgart

In just the past 15 minutes, I ran across these two unrelated articles on my #bigdata Twitter feed. Big Data Knows What You're Doing Right Now Wow! Twitter can tell you when you are going to get sick. One of my favorite things about Big Data are the ridiculous blog headlines you can craft, simply by playing off the newness and lack of understanding around what Big Data is. Take the first article for example. Time Magazine posits that aggregators are collecting a boatload of sensitive information about each and every one of us. Every time we accept a privacy policy or log in to Facebook or play an iPad app, a shadowy organization learns something new about us as individuals, powered of course by big data. Sounds scary right? The truth is Big Data likely doesn't have the first clue that I'm blogging about it right now. In fact, Big Data probably doesn't realize I just... (more)

Sometimes No Data Is Way Cooler than Big Data

I have a pretty decent amount of data about Disney World (where to stay, when to visit, how to beat the crowds to Space Mountain, etc.), and in turn, Disney knows a lot about me (my age, where I live, how many times I’ve visited the park, etc.). This information may seem trivial, but it’s essential (or so we think) for an experience that’s optimized for our enjoyment. In fact, Disney has made a big bet on this idea. You might have seen stories about Disney’s new “vacation management system” which is designed to learn even more about park visitors and, in turn, improve upon their... (more)

Nine Biggest Data Encryption Myths, Busted

Rarely a day goes by that you don't hear about a data breach. Hospital records stolen. Social media accounts hacked. Education transcripts revealed. Every industry is susceptible and every company is at risk. The result can be embarrassing and expensive at best and absolutely crippling at worst, with potential fines, time-consuming lawsuits, and subsequent loss of customer trust. The steady pace of breaches reinforces the need for encryption as a last line of defense. Recently however, one of the oldest and most effective security tactics has been largely relegated to an afterth... (more)

The NSA Can't Stifle Cloud Momentum

InfoWorld's been doing a bang-up job covering the NSA spying scandal from the get go, and this blog from David Linthicum titled, “Let the NSA spy on us - We’re still moving to the cloud,” continues the trend. The Cliff's notes: In an IDG News survey, high-ranking IT executives in North America and Europe were asked about the effect the NSA snooping practices have had on their cloud computing strategy. Despite the furor over the NSA, these leaders are still committed to the cloud. Linthicum talks about the dollars and cents, that efficiency and agility benefits that the cloud pro... (more)

Layered Security Is Key to Avoiding Heartbleed

While organizations spend the next few days and weeks patching OpenSSL vulnerabilities, the realization is setting in that we may never know the full extent of the damage caused by Heartbleed. Although Heartbleed was only announced in early April, it has actually been present in OpenSSL versions dating back to March 2012. This means hackers have had ample time to steal certificates and other sensitive information. Making matters worse, it's nearly impossible for companies to know whether their web communications have indeed been compromised. What exactly is being exposed? When e... (more)